Wire myography is an in vitro technique that allows us to examine functional responses and vascular reactivity of isolated small resistance arteries. Vessels from various species, including transgenic models, and vascular beds can be examined in a variety of pathological disease states. Vessels are dissected, cleaned, and then mounted onto a channel myograph under isometric techniques. Each vessel is then normalized to determine maximum active tension development. This allows the standardization of initial experimental conditions, an important consideration when examining pharmacological differences between vessels. Learn more about Living System’s wire myograph options below.

Wire Myography Chamber

The classic Halpern/Mulvany style wire myograph is back as a standard product available from Living Systems Instrumentation. Living System’s MYO-CH wire myograph chamber is faithful to the basic design first introduced by Living Systems Instrumentation founder, the late Professor William Halpern, and Professor Michael Mulvany in their classic 1976 Nature paper titled “Mechanical properties of vascular smooth muscle cells in situ” (Nature 260(5552): 617-619, 1976). At the same time, state-of-the-art materials, machining, and force technology have been introduced. Living System’s wire myographs include three types of tissue supports: wire-mounts for microvessels, L-bars for large ring preparations, and a hook for working with strips. Thus, Living System’s myograph is suitable for a range of applications including force measurements in microvessel rings, large vessels such as carotid artery and aorta, airway, intestine, bladder, and many more.

Features

  • Modular tissue supports that allow use of wire-mount microvessel ring preparations, Large and Small L-bars for working with large and small ring preps, and a hook attachment for working with strip preparations.
  • Convenient linear position controls in all three axes for the fixed tissue support. Force transducer support features smooth up-down position control, which simplifies alignments and initial slack adjustments.
  • Small bath volume (~5 ml) and optional self-heating capability for efficient use of expensive peptides and reagents.
  • Convenient integrated flow path helps achieve optimal flow pattern when bath superfusion is used.
  • Glass coverslip chamber bottom facilitates tissue attachments, as the chamber can be illuminated from underneath. Also allows for simultaneous imaging-force studies.
  • Precision force transducer capable of measuring forces from a few milligrams to 20 grams.
  • Convenient analog signal output for easy data acquisition. (MYO-SC-1)
  • Optional field stimulation electrodes available.
Force Transducer Signal Conditioner

The MYO-SC-1 Force Transducer Signal Conditioner is designed to convert the force measurement made by the force transducer in our MYO-CH wire myograph chamber into an analog voltage suitable for recording with an analog-to-digital converter or chart recording device.

Features

  • Convenient analog signal output for easy data acquisition.
  • User-friendly Auto-Zero (Tare) push button on the front panel. This makes adjusting the zero-force offset effortless.
  • Rotary knob for manual adjustment of the instrument offset voltage, if desired.
  • Rotary knob also serves to select force sensitivity range when pushed (2 gram, 10 gram, 20 gram).

Small animals including mice rats 

Wire Myograph Vessel Holders

Microvessel JawsLarge L-barsSmall L-BarsStrip Hooks

Living Systems Instrumentation is re-introducing the classic Halpern/Mulvany style wire myograph to our standard product line. The MYO-01 Wire Myograph Package includes a MYO-CH Wire Myograph Chamber with Modular Tissue Supports and a MYO-SC-1 Force Transducer Signal Conditioner.

Package Components:

  • Wire Myograph Chamber (MYO-01) with Modular Tissue Supports
    (MYO-CH)
  • Force Transducer Signal Conditioner (MYO-SC-1)
  • Power and signal output cables

In some cases, such as when using expensive peptides or other drugs, bath superfusion is not an option. These applications call for minimizing the volume of bath fluid to keep the amount of reagents used to a minimum. In these cases, heating the bath to physiological temperatures can be problematic. However, with our wire myograph chamber (MYO-CH) and temperature controller (TC-09S), you can heat the wire myograph chamber directly to physiological temperatures. This package contains everything needed to conduct these self-heating studies in our wire myograph chamber.

Package Components:

  • Wire Myograph Chamber with Modular Tissue Supports (MYO-CH)
  • Force Transducer Signal Conditioner (MYO-SC-1)
  • Temperature controller (TC-09S)
  • Thermistor temperature sensor (THRS)
  • Heater, power, and signal output cables

This is a dual myograph self-heated chamber package.

Package Components:

  • Two Wire Myograph Chambers with Modular Tissue Supports (MYO-CH)
  • Two Force Transducer Signal Conditioners (MYO-SC-1)
  • Dual Bath Temperature controller (TC-09D)
  • Two Thermistor temperature sensors (THRS)
  • Heater, power, and signal output cables

This is a four station myograph self-heated chamber package.

Package Components:

  • Four Wire Myograph Chambers with Modular Tissue Supports (MYO-CH)
  • Four Force Transducer Signal Conditioners (MYO-SC-1)
  • Two Dual Bath Temperature controller (TC-09D)
  • Four Thermistor temperature sensors (THRS)
  • Heater, power, and signal output cables
Living System’s thermal circulating bath is an economical heating circulator that includes the immersion heater unit, water bath, and circulating pump. The unit has a small footprint and low profile. Living System’ssearched many suppliers before we arrived at this unit, which delivers solid performance and economical prices.

Specifications

Reservoir capacity:                               6 L
Temperature range:                             5 °C over ambient to 150 °C
Temperature stability:                        ± 0.05 °C
Temperature readout:                        ºC or ºF
Pump inlet and outlet:                        0.25″ FPT
Input voltage:                                         120 V or 220 V, 50 or 60 Hz
Dimensions:                                            8.25″ W x 14.25″ H x 14″ D
Shipping weight:                                   23 lbs

Living System’s temperature controllers feature unsurpassed thermoregulatory performance. A novel control algorithm results in quicker time to reach set point (6–10 min, from 22 ºC to 37 ºC). Living System’s temperature controllers now feature analog outputs that produce signals compatible with most data acquisition systems. The thermostat control can also be disabled, allowing the TC-09S to be used as a temperature monitoring and recording device (using the analog output).

The TC-09S is designed to control the bath temperature in Living System’s CH-1 single vessel chambers under steady-state conditions, when bath superfusion is not used. This is particularly useful when you have a stagnant bath with a HEPES or MOPS buffered saline solution. The temperature controller is not able to regulate bath temperature in the presence of bath superfusion. In that case, it is preferable to use a heat exchanger in your superfusion line to warm the bath saline just before it enters the vessel bath.

Specification

Power:                                                            120 V or 220 V
Control limits:                                              ambient to 50 ºC
Accuracy:                                                       ±1 ºC
Time to reach 37 ºC:                                   6–10 min
(from 22 ºC)   
Analog output:                                             10 mV/0.1 ºC

Living System’s controllers feature unsurpassed thermoregulatory performance. A novel control algorithm results in quicker time to reach set point (6–10 min, from 22 ºC to 37 ºC). Living System’s temperature controllers now feature analog outputs that produce signals compatible with most data acquisition systems. The TC-09D has two heating controllers that can be used to regulate the bath temperature in the two baths of our CH-2 vessel chambers independently. The thermostat control can also be disabled, allowing the TC-09D to be used as a temperature monitoring and recording device (when using the analog output). Panel controls allow for regulating the bath temperature of both chambers, chamber 1 only, chamber 2 only, or monitor only (no temperature control).

The TC-09D is designed to control the bath temperature in Living System’s CH-2 dual vessel chambers under steady-state conditions, when bath superfusion is not used. This is particularly useful when you have a stagnant bath with a HEPES or MOPS buffered saline solution. The temperature controller is not able to regulate bath temperature in the presence of bath superfusion. In that case, it is preferable to use a heat exchanger in your superfusion line to warm the bath saline just before it enters the vessel bath.

Specification

Power:                                                                120 V or 220 V
Control limits:                                                 ambient to 50 ºC
Accuracy:                                                          ±1 ºC
Time to reach 37 ºC:                                      6–10 min
(from 22 ºC)   
Analog output:                                                10 mV/0.1 ºC

This meter provides a display of the temperature sensed by any of our thermistor temperature sensors. The THS-TEE sensor plugs directly into the TH-M meter. If you would like to monitor the temperature in one of our vessel baths using the THRS sensor a special cable is also required.
pH Meter

This high quality pH meter provides a continuous readout of pH. The pH electrode connects to the meter via a BNC connector. Use with PH-E or PH-TEE electrodes.

Specifications

pH range:                                                                            0–14, 0.01 resolution
Power:                                                                                  3 AAA batteries
Dimensions / weight:                                                      6.1″ H x 1.8″ W x 1.4″ D / 0.3 lb

a

pH Miniature Electrode 

This miniature pH electrode allows continuous pH monitoring in the bath solution of our vessel chambers. The PH-E is designed to fit inside the accessory port on the top of our standard vessel chamber covers. Reference solution is included.
Standard BNC termination; connects with most pH meters (see PH-M).

Specifications

pH sensitivity:                                                           0–14
Response time:                                                         5–15 sec solution and electrode: 3 mM KCl & Ag/AgCl
Dimensions:                                                              tip:~1.2 mm diameter body: 2.5 mm diameter length: 26 mm

a

pH Miniature Electrode 

This miniature pH electrode allows continuous pH monitoring in the bath solution of our vessel chambers. The PH-E is designed to fit inside the accessory port on the top of our standard vessel chamber covers. Reference solution is included.
Standard BNC termination; connects with most pH meters (see PH-M).

Specifications

pH sensitivity:                                                           0–14
Response time:                                                         5–15 sec solution and electrode: 3 mM KCl & Ag/AgCl
Dimensions:                                                              40 mm x 60 mm (excluding 2 m cable)
Living System’s offer 4 packages (1, 2, 4 or 8 channels) that are useful for applications requiring electric field stimulation. Each package includes a constant current stimulator(s), power supply cabinet, computer interface card, CATSTIM software, and interface cables. The output of each stimulator is accessible via a BNC connector.

Features

  • Isolated output eliminates the need for an external stimulus isolation unit
  • Perform completely independent stimulation protocols in each tissue bath or vessel chamber
  • Constant current stimulus in a low impedance solution such as physiological saline solution
  • Isolated monitor output allows the user to view the stimulus waveform using a separate oscilloscope
  • Stimulator parameters are set in the user-friendly CATSTIM software
  • Can be programmed to automatically deliver a sequence of stimulations using protocol files to encode the stimuli
  • No confusing knobs or switches to set
This handy weight kit includes small masses that are useful for calibrating force transducers, such as the one in Living System’s wire myograph chamber.

This kit includes the following items:

  • 1 gram weight
  • 2 gram weight
  • 5 gram weight
  • 10 gram weight
  • 20 gram weight

Each calibration weight has a thread loop attached, for easy hanging on the force transducer. Hanging hooks in two sizes are included

This kit is included when you purchase a Wire Myograph Chamber. You can always re-order this kit anytime as it’s a convenient way to have an assortment of commonly used accessories.

This kit includes the following:

  • ACC-BALL-DRIVER-.050 0.050″ Ball Driver Tool (qty 1)
  • ACC-BALL-DRIVER-1/16 1/16″ Ball Driver Tool (qty 1)
  • ACC-DRIVER-.035 0.035″ Hex Driver Tool (qty 1)
  • ACC-SCREWDRIVER-#1 #1 Phillips Screwdriver (qty 1)
  • ACC-DRIVER-T5 T5 Torx Driver Tool (qty 1)
  • COVER-SLIP-#1 (qty 10)
  • Force Transducer Calibration Weights and Calibration Stand (1 each: 1, 2, 5, 10, 20 grams)
  • Glass Inflow and Outflow Tubes for Myograph chamber (qty 2 total)
  • 3/32″ Tygon tubing (1 ft.)
  • 3-way stopcocks (qty 2)
  • Wire for mounting microvessels (1 ft. each: 15 um, 20 um, 25 um, 30 um)

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